Author Archive: Norfolk Library and Information Service

Grab & Go Bags

There’s something NEW & exciting in Norfolk Libraries – Grab & Go Bags

In a hurry?

Favourite author not writing quickly enough?

Struggling to find something new to read? or Simply spoilt for choice?

Why not pick up a Grab & Go bag. Bags of themed books chosen by staff for your enjoyment.

Choose your bag then just issue it through the self-service machine [3 week loan].

Grab & Go bags are available to suit all ages; Adult, Teen, Junior & Child (picture books).

Adult and Child bags contain 6 books and Teen and Junior bags contain 4 books.

Look out for the coloured labels, Adult/Blue; Teen/Purple; Junior/Yellow and Child/Red.

You are welcome to renew any or all of the books and just return the bag to the library.

Now available from: Dersingham, Downham Market, Gaywood, Hunstanton, Kings Lynn and North Walsham Libraries.

Happy reading #GrabAndGo

                

Notes from the 2017 Bailey’s Prize Ambassador: Sport of Kings by C.E. Morgan

From a short book to an epic – my fourth Bailey’s Prize read was the massive tome Sport of Kings. 500+ pages set in and around a ranch in Kentucky which raises race horses.  The book covers many themes including (but not limited to) racism, sexism, evolution, horse breeding and slavery. The prose is dense, rich and flowery. It is being billed as a modern American classic.

For me it felt a bit of a slog to get through. The basic story lines were all great and I wanted to know more about all of the characters but the language and the style just kept bogging me down and disappointingly the slow build was ruined by a too fast ending. I also just didn’t quite buy the main twist.

I admire this book without loving it, the racism and sexism alienated me and I never felt close to the characters – it was like they were all behind a pane of glass. I’m glad that the Bailey’s Prize introduced me to this book, I’d never have read it otherwise and there is much to admire.

Sarah

Notes from the 2017 Bailey’s Prize Ambassador: First Love by Gwendoline Riley

This was a real pace change from the first two books sent to me by the Reading Agency, it is a slender book with lots of white spaces – both on the cover and surrounding the text. I changed my reading style for this book by instinct. Usually I am a fast reader, swallowing books whole but something in this one made me slow down, to read each section then take a pause and I think that this made the book better.

The story is slight, it is about Neve and her relationship with her husband. On a quick read it seems that she is in a bad relationship – one that borders on being abusive and your sympathy is all with her. As you read on however you see that in this case the situation is quite as black and white as you’d think, Neve does come with her own baggage.

On the whole I admire this book without loving it. It doesn’t excuse domestic abuse but in some ways it does apologise for it – and I don’t like this.  For a small book this packs a deceptive punch and while it isn’t one that I’ll return to I think that it does deserve its place on the Bailey’s Shortlist as it is fresh and different.

Sarah

Notes from the 2017 Bailey’s Prize Ambassador: The Power – Naomi Alderman

My Bailey’s Book Prize reading as a 2017 Library Ambassador continued with The Power by Naomi Alderman and this was possibly this one I was looking forward to reading the most. For a start I’d heard about it and it was also about turning the world as we know it on its head without being an obvious dystopian/post-apocalyptic tale.

Sadly the book didn’t live up to my expectations – and even a week on I can’t quite explain why, it really should have ticked all my reading boxes. Strong women characters, alternative history…what’s not to like?

That I am still thinking so hard about this book must mean something but I think deep down I think that this would have made a brilliant short story or novella but that it was just a little too stretched into novel form.  The framing device also didn’t quite work for me, although it did deliver up the best last line of a book I think I’ve ever read.

When I read and then reviewed the book straight after finishing it I was possibly more ambivalent than I am now. I’ve chatted about it with more people, in the real world and online, and while this is never going to be my favourite book I think I can cope if it wins – I think the problem is with me. I wanted the book to be more than it was.

Sarah

Dementia Awareness Week – Book Collections in Libraries

Dementia Awareness Week takes place between the 14th and 20th May and is an Alzheimer’s Society Initiative. 

Reading Well Books on Prescription for Dementia recommends
books you might find useful if you have dementia, are caring for someone with dementia, or want to find out more about the condition. The books include information and advice, help after diagnosis, practical support for carers and personal stories.

The books are free to reserve and can be borrowed for up to 6 weeks. Browse and reserve the books for free here

Check them out on Pinterest here

Reminiscence kits and packs are available to borrow from the library for free, just like a book. The Reminiscence Kits contain
books and objects linked to a theme and are designed for working with individuals at various stages of memory loss.

Browse and reserve the Reminiscence Kits on the library
catalogue here

Find out more about Reading Well Books on Prescription for Dementia on the Reading Well website here

Check out our Healthy Libraries catalogue here

The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths

This is the latest in the Ruth Galloway and Harry Nelson series.

To be honest I didn’t find this book as interesting or exciting as the others. Not sure why as all the usual ingredients are included, bones found, crimes committed, fast action, interaction between Ruth & Harry. Perhaps it’s just me.

It all starts with a rough sleeper in King’s Lynn going missing, has she just moved away or has something happened to her? The word Underground keeps cropping up but what does it mean.

Some of the action is set in the chalk tunnels under Norwich, including the Guildhall. I wouldn’t want to go in them, and Ruth isn’t keen either!

Tracey

Reserve The Chalk Pit

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

My adventures as a Bailey’s Book Prize ambassador started with Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien and I reviewed it shortly after turning the last page on my own blog

A week on I have to say that I am still totally blown away by this book. Sweeping novels covering interesting periods of time from a personal view point are personal favourites of mine but the ‘voice’ of the narrator is very important.

With Do Not Say… I quickly got under the skin of our modern day narrator, Marie, and at first I wanted to know more about her and resented the times when the story flipped to China.  However as the links between past and present became clearer I just wanted more and more of all of the stories.

I knew the broad strokes of Chinese history during the twentieth century but this really brought home just what the phrases ‘Cultural Revolution’ and ‘Great Leap Forward’ actually meant for the general population. I also liked very much that the book continued up to and beyond the events of Tienanmen Square in 1989.

This book has left me with a real ‘book hangover’ and I’m finding it hard to get into any new book – let alone the other five Bailey’s titles!

Sarah

The Cake Shop in the Garden by Carole Matthews

Fay runs a cakeshop cum tea room in the back garden of her Mum’s house and on her canal barge. It is becoming more and more popular. She also has to look after her bed ridden Mum.

All the cakes are homemade , the descriptions of which make you want to drool! They sound delicious. There’s a recipe for ‘Totally Gooey Triple Choc Brownies’ at the end of the book, I have taken a note of it!

The story moves along very well, characters well written and interact well with each other. The story includes sibling rivalry, a hunky love interest, tragedy, despair and much more.

Watch out for the handbell ringing!

Try this tale of a family with long hidden secrets, you’ll enjoy it.

Must get my next Carole Matthews fix from the library.

Debbie

Reserve The Cake Shop in the Garden

 

Bailey’s Book Prize: Library Ambassador

I’m very excited that I have been picked as a Library Ambassador for this year’s Bailey’s Book Prize.  Previous winners of the Bailey’s Prize (and previous incarnations of the prize) feature highly in my list of ‘favourite books I’ve ever read.’

Norfolk has just had a hugely successful reading campaign Norfolk’s Most Wanted and this has shown just how popular reading is still and to have the chance to read all six of this year’s short listed titles and share my thoughts on them as I read.

This year the six books on the short list are not ones that had really been on my reading radar, I think I’d heard bits of Naomi Alderman’s The Power when it was read on the radio but that’s as far as it goes.  I’m really looking forward to discovering six new books and sharing my thoughts.

The first book I picked out of the box was Do Not Say We Have Nothing and my thoughts on that one are coming soon.

Look out for displays around the Bailey’s Prize in a library near you and I hope to have the final details of an event celebrating the Bailey’s Prize at the Millennium Library very soon.

You can read more about the library ambassadors here and I’d love to hear your thoughts on my progress and the books either here or on twitter where I am @norfolkbookworm

Sarah, Millennium Library

A Banquet of Consequences by Elizabeth George

What a mixed up family are at the heart of this, the latest Inspector Lynley and Barbara Havers novel. Ably assisted by Winston Nkata.

It all starts with the suicide of William Goldacre, devastating to those left behind. Why did he do it, nobody really knows or if they do they’re not saying.

A couple of years later we have a murder (or do we) in Cambridge, bestselling feminist writer Clare Abbott. Her personal assistant is Caroline Goldacre, William’s mother.

Barbara Havers is desperate to redeem herself, and she is convinced there is a connection. She badgers Lynley into getting her on the case, which he does.

This is a novel of deeply hidden secrets, distorted truths, sexual complications, madness and much more.

Some of it is a bit convoluted and could maybe have been shortened. Interesting murder weapon.

As usual with Elizabeth George it is well written, the characters come to life in the reading of it and their interaction adds to the story.

Eileen

Reserve A Banquet of Consequences

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